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Loire Valley Day Tour - Villandry and more Castle List

Chateau D'Azay-Le-Rideau Azay-le-Rideau is dramatically situated on an island in the Indre river, its architecture appearing to rise right out of the water. The plush interiors are decorated in the Italian Renaissance style popular when it was first built in the 16th century. One of the newest exhibits is in the attic, showing the complicated beam and buttress design needed to hold the massive roof. Villandry Villandry features the finest formal gardens in Europe. The dilapidated gardens and castle were restored to their 16th century glory in the 1900's, by a wealthy American heiress, Ann Coleman, and her French husband Joachim Carvallo. It takes 8 gardeners working full time to plant, prune and care for the 60,000 vegetable plants and...

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American Cemetery at Colleville-Sur-Mer

The Military Cemetery at Omaha Beach Situated above Omaha Beach, a place where the American military suffered staggering casualties on D-Day, the American cemetery at Colleville-Sur-Mer contains the remains of nearly 10,000 servicemen who died during the Normandy campaign. With marble crosses and Stars of David stretching as far as the eye can see, the cemetery is a solemn, breathtaking experience that all Americans should share. Omaha Beach is accessible from the cemetery atop the bluffs. The World War II Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial is situated on a cliff overlooking Omaha Beach and the English Channel in the village of Colleville-sur-Mer, France. It is just east of St. Laurent-sur-Mer and northwest of Bayeux about one hundred and seventy miles...

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The Normandy D-Day Tour Stops

Arromanches The modest fishing and resort town of Arromanches was a key toehold for the Allies on June 6. Remnants of so-called "Mulberrys" remain off shore, where the rough seas of the bay were tamed enough to keep ships anchored and maintain a supply chain for the troops. Visitors to Arromanches, located at what was code named Gold Beach, will appreciate seeing the huge undertaking of the invasion from the cliff top perspective. Interestingly, the town and bay have been important strategically to successive waves of Celts, Gauls and Vikings. The American Cemetery at Colleville-Sur-Mer Situated above Omaha Beach, the American cemetery at Colleville-Sur-Mer honors the more than 9,000 servicemen who died during the campaign to liberate Normandy in the...

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Canadian Normandy D-Day Tour Stops

Bernieres-Dur-Mer   Bernieres-sur-Mer, then and now. This tiny village was liberated street by street in heavy hand to hand fighting on June 6, 1944 by the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada unit. Juno Beach Centre   Juno Beach on D-Day, 1944 Dedicated on June 6, 2003, the Juno Beach Centre in Courseulles reflects the passionate vision of Canadian D-Day veteran Garth Webb. Mr. Webb wanted the sacrifice of Canadians in France to be commemorated and celebrated at the Centre. Beny-Sur-Mer Beny-Sur-Mer Canadian soldiers who died on D-day and early in the Battle of Normandy are buried at the Canadian Cemetery in Beny-sur-Mer. Central to the immaculate landscaping is the Cross of Sacrifice. Over 2000 men lie buried, including 4 British...

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History of the Chenonceau Castle

Chenonceau first appears in historical documents around the 11th century. The Marques family was in possession of the chateau until the 15th century. Chenonceau's modern history begins around this time. 1411A royal decree against the Marques family patriarch, Jean Marques, for an act of sedition, included an order for the destruction of the original manor at Chenonceau. 1432Jean Marques builds a castle and a fortified mill to replace the lost manor of Chenonceau. A short video tour of Chenonceau: 1513Pierre Marques, the heir of Jean, up to his eyes in debt, sells the castle, which was readily purchased by Thomas Bohier, the General Tax Collector for the neighboring region of Normandy. 1515Thomas Bohier razes all of the existing buildings at...

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